How Will You Apply to College?

Posted on: July 28th, 2014

Applying to college has changed dramatically the past 15 years. In addition to no longer using paper applications, colleges have created different application decisions and deadlines.

Early Decision (ED)

Early Decision is a binding agreement between the student, parents, school counselor and college. The contract stipulates that if offered admission, the student will withdraw all other applications and accept admission into that school.

A student would apply ED to a college if they knew it was their absolute top choice, especially at a school in which they might not be the strongest applicant. The ED applicant pool is much smaller than the Regular Decision pool. This allows for students to be compared with a fewer number of applicants, as only ED applications are compared, thus increasing a student’s chance of admission. It can hurt a student if the student does not stand out amongst other applicants.

Early Action (EA)

This application deadline allows students to apply earlier to a particular college/university, usually on the first of November. In return, colleges agree to act on their application earlier, by the end of the calendar year. This is a plus for students because they will learn earlier if they are accepted to college. If denied or deferred, this provides additional time to reassess their college applications. As with ED, schools only compare EA applications when admitting students. Colleges again, prefer the EA process because they are able to accept a particular amount of students which will many times increase the probability of students accepting admission.

Restrictive/Single Choice Early Action

This is a newer entry into the college application process, generally seen in a highly selective college. This application option will allow students to apply ‘early’ to one college. The difference between this option and ED is that there is no binding acceptance agreement. Students ethically agree not to apply ED or EA to other colleges, in hopes of an early acceptance from a highly selective college. Once a student receives notification, they are free to apply to other colleges.

Regular Decision (RD)

This is the standard option for a student application. Some schools will offer a ‘rolling admissions’ option in RD. This means that schools will notify students days or weeks upon receiving a completed application. Other schools will notify students in the applicant pool on one date later in the application process (around March or April 1st).

TIPS: Always remember to pay attention to deadlines. Students should also pay attention to all aspects of their application files to ensure they are complete, such as letters of recommendations, essay supplements, fees, etc… Missing a deadline or a component of your file might mean missing out on an opportunity to attend the school of your choice.

There are more pluses and minuses to the application processes, contact us to learn which option is best for you.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

Explaining How to Use the Common App When Applying to College

Posted on: July 28th, 2014

The Common Application, also known as the Common App, is an undergraduate college admission application shared among 517 member colleges and universities in the United States and 6 foreign countries. About one-third of these member institutions use the Common App as their exclusive admission application. Founded in 1975, the Common App is currently in its 4th edition.

Online Exclusive Application

The Common Application has two versions: first-year admission and transfer admission. Each of these applications are available exclusively online, paper copies cannot be submitted to member schools. The first day to begin the application for the following fall is August 1st. The commonality of the application allows for all entered information to be submitted to selected schools electronically via the Common Application website. A student may also create separate versions of the application for individual schools if they wish. Once the application is transmitted to a college online, it cannot be changed for that college. If the student would like to edit the application after submission, they must contact the college directly. The Common Application also allows the student to submit and track other components of their application such as supplements, payments, and school forms.

Holistic Review

The mission of this not-for-profit organization is to encourage member schools to create a ‘holistic selection process’ for student admission. This means a student is judged subjectively by each prospective school using such factors as essays, letters of recommendation and extracurricular activities along with objective factors such as class rank, standardized test scores and Grade Point Average (GPA). The Common App believe this holistic review allows for schools to promote equity and integrity in the college admission process. Only schools who accept the holistic admission criteria (not solely objective factors) are accepted into membership.

Essay Prompts

There are five essay prompts on the Common Application in which a student has the flexibility to choose to answer one. Five new questions were created for the 4th edition which began for the 2013-14 admission year. Along with new questions, the length of the essay remained at the 250 word minimum, but increased from 500 to a 650 maximum word limit. The essay prompts are the main aspect of the application. The student should allow the admission office to learn about their: values, uniqueness and creativity. The student should also be creative, reflective, expressive and honest about themselves, while portraying their writing and critical thinking skills.

Supplement Questions

Many member institutions require a ‘Common App Supplement.’ These are additional question(s) that are asked in order to complement a student’s application. Many times, colleges will ask specific questions regarding the school or programs they have to offer. There are only two restrictions for a supplement question: that it does not re-ask questions already answered and that it does not violate the National Association for College Admissions Counselors Statement of Principles and Good Practice.

If you would like more advice or tips on the Common Application, contact us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

Create a Dynamic Resume for College

Posted on: May 28th, 2014

Summer is almost here, but that should not mean that it is time for a high school student to rest. Rather, it should mean the student should work on activities that have been low on their priority list during the busy school year. One of these items should be to create or edit their high school resume. Here are some suggestions on what a student should have on their resume.

Involvement

If your student has not already done so, they should get involved. Every school has a plethora of sports, clubs and activities. If students are unsure about a club’s activities, they should seek out the sponsor or attend a meeting. Remember, students are not obligated to attend the next meeting. Colleges seek students who actively participate in a variety of activities. Joining a school activity can help students expand their circle of friends, establish a college resume and perhaps even find their passion.

Leadership Positions

Colleges do not want to see a plethora of activities on a student’s resume, but rather a few in which they are deeply and passionately involved. Perhaps a student can show off their leadership qualities by becoming the captain of their athletic team. This does not mean they have to be the best player on the team, but the hardest working player or the motivator. Perhaps they can work hard in an attempt to become first chair in their section in band, or take on roles of their club/student council with their eyes on the club presidency. Colleges want dynamic students on their campus who can succeed when being challenged.

Rigorous Coursework

Over the years I have had conversations with numerous college admissions representatives (or the same people that read your student’s college application). One of most important factors colleges use to evaluate an applicant’s admissions are their high school transcripts. Each representative examines the high school transcripts to assess how much a student has challenged themselves. They especially look for Honors or Advanced Placement level coursework. Admissions representatives understand that these elite courses are not for every student, nor do they want to see poor marks on the transcripts. The suggestion was given for a high school student to enroll in the hardest courses that will challenge themselves, while experiencing success.

Internships/Job

“If my high school student does not get involved at school, they will NEVER get into college!” It is true colleges want students involved, but perhaps school activities are not of interest to the student. Yet, students still need to be involved in something other than the ‘Couch Potato Club.’ Perhaps they can seek employment in a field of potential college major/career interest. This will provide invaluable experience in the field, while being exposed to everyday tasks. If a job is not available at a particular company, perhaps there are summer internship opportunities or even a job shadow program. This will also help a student to build communication skills and high school resume, while exposing them to the concept of networking with potential employers.

Do you have other ideas on what a high school student can do to create a dynamic college resume? Leave a comment and let us know. Need help with your high school student in the college selection or application process, Contact Us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

What does the Indy 500, a Saint and Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Have in Common?

Posted on: May 21st, 2014

This Memorial Day weekend will mark the 98th running of the Indianapolis 500. In honor of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” I felt it was only appropriate to write about my visit to Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, just outside Terre Haute, Indiana.

Saint Mother Theodore Guerin

How many college campuses can boast they have a saint on their campus? SMWC has a shrine, which includes the remains of Mother Theodore Guerin, in the Church of the Immaculate Conception. Saint Mother Guerin emigrated from France in 1839 at the request of the Diocese of Vincennes. Along with 5 other French nuns, she set roots outside Terre Haute, Indiana to minister. Her accomplishments include founding a new religious order (Sisters of Providence) and numerous schools in the Indiana/Illinois area, including the eventual Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. She has been attributed to two miracles, one taking place in the church itself, allowing her to be canonized a saint in 2006.

Sisters of Providence and Women’s Education

St. Mary-of-the-Woods College (SMWC) is the nation’s oldest all women’s, liberal arts, Catholic college, founded in 1840 by Mother Theodore Guerin and the Sisters of Providence. It is still run by the Sisters of Providence, which has nearly 300 sisters residing on campus grounds. In 1984, the campus began offering co-educational graduate school programs, but the over 1500 undergraduates are all female, either on campus or in distance learning programs.

College Ring

The SMWC ring is the most recognizable image of the college. The tradition of the ring began as a way to honor the academic success and sacrifice of the students, while also being able to show their pride and loyalty to SMWC. There are two ceremonies connected with the rings. Ring Day occurs during junior year where the women are bestowed their rings. The other is the Oakleaf Ceremony where students are inducted into the alumnae association by turning their rings around, such as an acorn turns into an oak tree.

School of Equine Studies

By now, you have been reading this post and still wondering, where is the Indianapolis 500 connection? The School of Equine Studies is named after current Chairwoman of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Mari Hulman George, who along with her mother, Mary Fendrich Hulman are alumnae of SMWC.

At SMWC, women can pursue two paths in Equine Science: General Studies or Equine Training & Instruction. The General Studies program allows students to explore different areas of equine study through a variety of courses.

The Equine Training & Instruction major is for students to become either a trainer or instructor of horses. Throughout the coursework, students are exposed to different philosophies, techniques and approaches to training and instructing. These courses can be designed specifically for either training or instructing, or a combination of both.

When you are watching the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday and hear Mari Hulman George command, “Lady and Gentlemen…start your engines!” make sure to think of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College.

If you would like to know more about Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, or other colleges or equine programs, contact us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

The Decision - How to Select the Proper College

Posted on: April 25th, 2014

Can you see yourself here?

May 1st is around the corner and that means high school seniors must send their housing deposit to the college of their choice. If a student fails to inform a school by this date, colleges will no longer guarantee their admission. Here are a few tips for a high school senior to make a proper decision on which college to attend.

Social Fit

As an 18 year old high school senior, it is hard to imagine making a decision that will impact the next four years of their life. The first step to make sure the school is the proper social fit. Having hopefully already visited campus, this on-campus experience should have provided the student enough knowledge to make an informed decision. But can the family envision the student on campus, participating in the activities in the quad, eating in the dining halls or sleeping in the dorms rooms? If they can, this is a good sign. If they cannot, perhaps a last minute follow-up visit to the campus might be in order.

Financial Fit

By now, the soon to be college freshman has received a plethora of acceptance letters and financial aid awards. Reexamine each of the acceptance letters and financial aid awards and ask yourself, “Can I afford to send my son/daughter to this school?” If the answer is a clear cut yes, then compare each of the school’s finances together. Think about the programs they offer and your likes/dislikes about each school to make a proper decision. Select the school that you feel is the best fit for your family.

If there is some hesitation in affordability, here are some things to consider regarding the college:

  • How many loans will the student have to take out?
  • What will the final amount of loans be when the student graduates in four years?
  • Can my son/daughter receive the same quality education at a school that is not their first choice, but offering more in terms of financial aid?
  • Is the scholarship they are receiving a one year scholarship or renewable for four years?
  • What are the qualifications to be renewed?

These are important questions to discuss as a family this weekend, remember May 1st is next week!

Eliminate Friends From Decision

You can meet new friends at school,
such as

the Colgate Raider!

Many high school seniors are afraid to leave their comfort zone. Many adults are like this too; it is only natural. Making their college decision based upon where their friends will be attending is not a recommended way to make a decision. With Facebook, Twitter, text messaging, Skype/Facetime and email (snail mail to teenagers) students will easily be able to keep in touch. This is a great time for students to learn to think for themselves, be an individual and make an adult decision. They should choose the college that best fits themselves academically, socially and financially; not those of their friends. Young adults are resilient, they will be able to find their routine by keeping in touch with their high school friends while also making a campus full of new ones.

Common Application

While I was writing my blog post, the Common Application posted this on their Facebook page. I felt it was only fitting to add this to my post:

Choosing which college to attend is an intensely personal decision, and you probably don’t want anyone second-guessing your choice once you’ve made it. Just remember it’s a two-way street. It’s far more important for you to celebrate and support your friends’ decisions than it is for you to understand them.

Well said Common Application!


Post a comment regarding your college acceptance experience! If you have questions regarding the college process, contact us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

Decoding the Financial Aid Letter

Posted on: April 19th, 2014

As the May 1st deadline approaches for students to inform colleges of their intent to enroll, it is the perfect time to decode the financial aid letter. Listed below are four types of ‘awards’ found on a typical financial aid letter.

1. Scholarships

A scholarship is an award based upon student merit, meaning, students have accomplished something exceptional. This is on their high school academic record or their standardized test score (ACT, SAT, etc…). Other types of scholarships are based upon a student’s unique talent, such as their athletic performance or musical ability. Scholarships are awarded for various lengths (first year only, renewable for four years, etc…). Make sure you investigate their stipulations. No matter the length, scholarships do not need to be repaid to the school.

2. Grants

These are similar to scholarships as they do not need to be repaid, but they are based upon ‘need.’ These can from the institution in which you were accepted or from the federal government. There are 3 common federal grants:

  • Federal Pell Grant: Up to $5,500 awarded to students who demonstrate financial need.
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant: In addition to the Pell Grant, this award is up to $4,000 for families that demonstrate exceptional financial need.
  • TEACH Grant: Up to $4,000 is provided to students who take coursework in education. Students then agree to complete four years serving children in low-income communities.

3. Federal Work-Study

This program is designed for students to earn the awarded amount in an on or off campus job. There are ample campus jobs reserved for federal work-study students. Students cannot earn in excess of the amount offered on the award letter. Most common positions are working in the admissions office, school cafeteria or recreation center.

4. Loans

Many time, in the financial award letter, schools will package in loans to help defray the remaining cost of attendance. The four type of main loans are:

  • Direct Subsidized Loan: These are the first loans awarded based upon financial need. They are given for a 10 year repayment period and accruing interest is paid by the Department of Education (DOE) until 6 months after a student leaves school. The loan limit is $3,500 to $5,500, depending upon the year in school.
  • Federal Perkins Loan: These loans are in addition to the above loan, if the government deems there is still financial need. The interest rate is slightly higher, but again, interest is paid by the DOE provided a student is in school. The loan limit is up to $5,500 for undergraduate students.
  • Direct Unsubsidized Loan: These loans are not based upon financial need. The borrower is responsible for all interest. The amount awarded is based upon grade level and dependency status.
  • Direct PLUS Loan: This loan is for a student’s parents or guardians. It is not based upon need and the borrower assumes all interest. The interest rate is slightly higher, but generally it will be lower than an outside private (or bank) loan. The maximum amount borrowed is the cost of attendance, minus any financial aid received.

Remember, when comparing financial aid award letters, do not compare the amount the school is awarding the student. Compare the financial commitment of the family between schools and the amount of loans the family will have to repay.

If you have questions regarding your family’s financial aid award letter or how to prepare for the rising cost of college, contact us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

The 5 Cards of a College Experience

Posted on: April 7th, 2014

Otterbein University is known as a college of opportunity since its founding in 1847. This progressive university takes pride in the fact that the first two graduates of this Westerville, Ohio campus were women. Located 15 minutes from Columbus, the 2400 undergraduates have access to internships, job opportunities and student activities. Although a suburban campus, Otterbein offers students a quintessential small college experience.

Equestrian Program

The Austin E. Knowlton Center for Equine Science, a $5 million equine facility makes Otterbein a leader in the equestrian field. This state-of-the-art facility allows up to 60 student to board and use their horses in the indoor riding stable. This impressive complex has not only enhanced their equestrian program, but provides students the opportunity to study unique majors such as Equine Preveterinary Medicine and Equine Business Management.

The Equine Pre-Veterinary Medicine program prepares students for graduate school programs and colleges of veterinary medicine. Included in the program are multiple internship opportunities, along with employment at Otterbein’s own equine facility.

The Equine Business Management Program offers students the opportunity to learn about careers in the equine world. Such careers in the equine field using this degree might be: manager of an equine facility, an equine insurance adjusters and breeding farm administrator.

Theatre Program

Otterbein Theatre and Dance department is nationally renowned. The program attracts students from across the nation. Amongst the thousands of applicants each year, the department invites approximately 400 students to a live audition. This competitive department accepts only 4 males and 4 females to earn a BFA in the acting and musical theatre program. A limited number of students will also be accepted into the BFA Design &Technology program. Students can also choose to earn a BA in Theatre, which offers more flexibility as students can study more than one area of theatre.

Shared Government

Since 1920, administrators at Otterbein administrators believe that the running of the school should involve the students. The board of trustees has an elected student representative that maintains equal voting rights on every matter of the school. This is something truly unique amongst college hierarchies.

Five Card Experience

Every Otterbein Cardinal is guaranteed the following experiences while at school.:

  1. Participation in undergrad research
  2. Involvement in community engagement.
  3. Contribution in a global engagement and/or an intercultural experience. Many OU students will take advantage of studying abroad at one of the 30 partner universities.
  4. Internships and Professional Experience. Located 15 minutes outside of the state capital, finding a place to hone your skills while an undergrad is not difficult. OU prides itself on their student internship assistance program on campus.
  5. Leadership and citizenship. These experiences combined will allow Otterbein students to leave school with an experiential transcripts proclaiming what they were able to participate in, while attending school.

These five guarantees allow students the experience and training for jobs to be created in an ever changing world. With a strong liberal arts core curriculum, Otterbein graduates are well rounded and well prepared for life after Otterbein.

If you would like to know more about Otterbein University, or other colleges, contact us.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

UBP '14

Posted on: April 4th, 2014

The Annual Frog Fountains at Texas Christian University (TCU)

Welcome to In and Around the Quad, an ongoing discussion created by Thomas J. Jaworski, founder and lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. In this blog, I will help guide families through the college admissions process. Did you know:

  • For the 2012-13 academic year, 151 colleges charged annual tuition, fees, room and board totaling more than $50,000, according to College Board?
  • There are over 500 Common Application members in 46 states and the District of Columbia, as well as in France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and Switzerland?
  • As of January 1st, you can begin and submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) without having finished your 2013 Federal Income Taxes?
  • Even though many colleges and universities are changing to Score Choice, SuperScore and/or becoming test optional, your ACT/SAT score should align closer with the median 75% than the median 25% when comparing your admission prospects for a particular school?

Would you like to learn more about the college process or understand the above statements? Come back weekly as I will post advice, strategy, tips, news and notes from around the college world.

Feel free to contact us with specific questions, subscribe to our E-Newsletter or take our College Finder Quiz.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

Unfamiliar Universities in the NCAA Tournament

Posted on: March 24th, 2014

This past weekend, the names of 68 colleges were discussed during the opening rounds of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. We decided to provide some background information on a few schools that might be unfamiliar to college bound high school families.

Mercer University

The Bears of Mercer University were the talk of the nation on Friday afternoon after upsetting Duke. Mercer is home to nearly 4,500 undergraduate students. This Macon, Georgia school was founded in 1833 with an endowment from Baptist leader, Jesse Mercer. Today this secular school, which started with just 39 students has 3 campuses. The main campus located in Macon, a Savannah campus that houses the School of Medicine and graduate/professional education campus in Atlanta. The Princeton Review consistently ranks it in the top 10% of all colleges and universities in North America, stating in 2014 that “Mercer’s exceptional reputation springs from its sound academic programs, excellent faculty, and modern facilities.”

University of Dayton

Upsets of both Ohio State and Syracuse propelled the Flyers of the University of Dayton into the Sweet 16. UD, a private, research university located in Dayton, Ohio, was founded in 1850 by priests and brothers in the tradition of the Society of Mary and is one of three Marianist universities in the U.S. Located 69 miles from the state’s capital (and Ohio State) in Columbus, UD was originally home to 14 boys and called St. Mary School for Boys. It now has over 8,000 undergraduate students on 388 acres along the shores of the Great Miami River. The University of Dayton ranks 115th on the 2013 U.S. News & World Report’s list of “National Universities while Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review ranked Dayton’s undergraduate program in entrepreneurship 18th in the nation.

Stephen F. Austin University

As a number 12 seed, Stephen F. Austin University shocked Virginia Commonwealth University in overtime to advance to the third round. Named after ‘the Father of Texas’, this Nacogdoches, Texas school was established in 1921 as a teachers college. Today, nearly 13,000 students reside on part of the homestead of another founding Texas father, Thomas Jefferson Rusk. It is one of four public universities in Texas that is independent of the University of Texas system. In 2011, SFAU was ranked 71st in the Best Colleges in the West Region by U.S. News & World Report.

Creighton University

National Division I scoring leader, and the coach’s son, Doug McDermott, helped propel Creighton University into the national lexicon during the men’s college basketball season. Creighton University is a private, research university located just outside the downtown business district in Omaha, Nebraska. Its 132 acre campus is home to over 4,100 undergraduate students, with nearly fifty percent traveling over 400 miles to attend Creighton. The school was founded in 1878 as a gift to honor prominent Omaha businessman Edward Creighton. Today the school is affiliated with the religious order Society of Jesus and is governed by the Jesuit core values of pursuing justice, striving for excellence and service to others.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting

4 (More) College Degrees for Post Graduation Employment

Posted on: March 12th, 2014

A few blog posts back, we wrote about some of the hottest college majors. Due to the favorable response, we decided to write about four more educational opportunities for post graduation employment.

Actuarial Science

Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty. Data science draws from the fields of mathematics, statistics, and computer science to assess the risk that an event will occur. They help businesses, such as the insurance industry and develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk.

With the volume of computerized data rapidly growing, the Department of Labor project actuary jobs to grow 26 percent in the next ten years. Actuaries will be needed to develop, price, and evaluate a variety of insurance products and calculate the costs of new risks.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapists are often an important part of rehabilitation and treatment of patients with chronic conditions or injuries. Demand for physical therapy services will come from the aging baby boomer population and their need for more medical care. In addition, physical therapists will be needed to treat people with mobility issues stemming from chronic conditions, such as diabetes or obesity.

The college curriculum has recently changed in this field. Students now need to obtain a Master’s Degree in Physical Therapy, while also being licensed by their state, in order to be able to work in the field. Many colleges have six-year direct admissions programs, where students combine their undergrad and graduate work.

Colleges are facing large amounts of applications for their programs due to the projected growth. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a 36 percent increase in this field over the next ten years.

Sustainable Development

With the explosion of green technology, organic products and the concept of sustainability grows in popularity, many students are turning their passion into a Sustainable Development degree.

Students studying this field have described coursework to be similar to environmental science but with more business and economic courses. Students learn that sustainability is attending to and combining the “Three Es:” environment, economy, and (social) equity. Sustainable Development programs work to achieve this by integrating academics with community engagement and outreach.

Students with this degree can have a variety of job opportunities awaiting them. Some of those possibilities are Construction Project Manager, Sustainability Analyst, Sustainable Design Professional, Energy Efficiency Analyst and Operations Manager.

PETROLEUM ENGINEERING

Petroleum engineers design and develop methods for extracting crude oil and natural gas from deposits below the earth’s surface, while also developing new techniques to extract oil and gas from existing reservoirs.

There are only 22 universities in which a student can choose to study petroleum engineering. But if they so choose to attend one of these universities, students can expect to study mathematics, chemistry, geology and physics. Students will receive education to use advanced computer systems to oversee automated drilling operations, as well as analysis of reservoir behavior.

According to the Department of Labor, employment of petroleum engineers is projected to grow 26 percent the next ten year. Oil prices will be a major determinant of employment growth, as higher prices lead to increasing complexity of oil companies’ operations. This leads to the need for more engineers for each drilling operation. The entry salary for a Petroleum Engineer is near $85,000 and has the highest median pay of all college graduates according to USA Today.

To learn which schools offer these majors or to learn of other popular majors, contact us!

Are you aware of other college majors that represent particularly timely opportunities for students? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page or comment on Twitter or Google+.

Thomas Jaworski is the lead consultant of Quest College Consulting. He is an Independent College Counselor with over ten years experience in the college admission process as an Certified Illinois Teacher (Type 09) and Counselor (Type 73) while also a member of IECA and NACAC. For more information, you can visit his website at QuestCollegeConsulting.com or email him at tjaworski@QuestCollegeConsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter @Tom_QuestCC or on Facebook at Facebook.com/QuestCollegeConsulting